Studies show that the food we eat can be a great tool in the fight against cancer.

This is just one of the things Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) uses in a patient’s plan. But the food they serve, is not only going to get even healthier, it’s going to be at the tip of their hands.

Baby carrots and fennel are just a few of the foods that Frank Caputo loves to cook with. He’s the executive chef at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Goodyear.

Food is a part of the holistic approach the hospital takes when it comes to treating cancer patients.

“We try to concentrate on mainly lowering sodium, saturated fat,” Caputo said. “And then we start going towards the specialized diets; gluten-free, the vegan, no iodine or low iodine.”

Caputo does that with organic produce. But when it comes to buying it, he won’t have to go far. The Goodyear campus will soon have its own organic farm.

“Were going to have carrots, beats, broccoli, radishes, squashes and eggplant, all different kinds of kale,” Caputo said.

The hospital partnered up with local farmer, Bob McClendon of McClendon’s Select.

“Were going to have a state of the art organic farm, 25 acres right next to the hospital,” McClendon said. “It can’t get any fresher than that for the kitchen staff.”

McClendon’s company has been supplying organic food to the chef’s menu for more than a year.

“I’m a cancer survivor myself, so it really hit home when I saw what they did,” McClendon said.

“They care about what they cook with. They care about the quality of the food that they’re patients, but not just their patients, their staff,” he continued. “Their staff eats the same food.”

Go ahead and ask Beverly Knudson. Her cancer is in remission.

“I really didn’t realize how important food was until I came here,” Knudson said. “Now I eat things that I have never eaten before. “I eat salads. I eat organic things.”

“This is a spectacular opportunity for us to show number one our community and our patients how much we are committed to helping them battle this disease,” Caputo said. “Make it through the treatments and continue on with their life.”

The first planting is expected to take place on November first.

CTCA is also planning on letting patients grow their own veggies as well as opening an educational center where cooking demos and nutrition classes will be available to the public.

For more information go to www.cancercenter.com.